Commentary, entertainment, Family story, justice, kindness, love, opinion, personal history, Social Justice, Society, Uncategorized

May rejection make you smile: my wish for job-seekers

My first week as a public librarian was all I could have hoped for and then some. There’s an overwhelming amount of information to absorb, all of it fascinating. The people I’m working with, to a one, have been fabulous. They’re supportive, welcoming and just the right amount of friendly – a matter-of-fact “here’s what I do, feel free to ask questions about it,” not the fake “rah rah team!” kind that makes you wonder if you’ve accidentally  joined a cult.

Also, a lot of my new co-workers started working there as teens and either stayed on after high school working their way up the various work tracks, or left and came back after going to other places. That says a lot.

Friday, when I got home, my e-mail in-box contained my 12th rejection e-mail from my former place of employment. I know I did good work there, and (as I said in a previous post), was turned loose because of funding cuts, not performance.

I’m honestly not sure why I’ve been turned down for every position I’ve applied to at my former employer. In at least one case, I know that the person who got the position had a degree that was more compatible with the position description than mine. And mind you, I applied for jobs at a lot of other places this year too – one of the requirements for unemployment is to apply for four jobs a week. Most were writing positions, some in student services at various local colleges, and a few library jobs.

I got really used to radio silence or rejection.

None of it was surprising. I spent 10 of the 11 years at my former job informing people of their particular barriers to employment (eg: old, fat, wrong ethnicity, wrong gender, criminal history, lack of experience, lack of stable work history, gaps in work history, etc), so they could be aware of and, where possible, do what they could to mitigate them. So I had no illusions about my barriers – older, female, and can strike more corporate-minded people as being a bit “unusual,” although under my strange-seeming exterior beats the heart of a corporate type’s dream colleague/supervisee.

My work philosophy is pretty simple. Show up on time, do what you’re asked to the best of your ability, do it with a cheerful spirit. Be kind to your colleagues, and respect the authority of everyone’s titles. Nothing is personal at work. I’ve never taken a job expecting it to fulfill my social needs. That’s why I have friends. And Sweetheart. And Matey, Betty & Grover. (I have made wonderful friends along the way at various jobs, but that was a happy by-product and bonus, not the main objective.)

MateyOptimized

It’s her job to meet my social needs

Still, it’s no fun to get rejection letter after rejection letter, particularly when you’re applying for positions you know you could walk in, sit down and rock. I will be brutally honest here and say that I wasn’t overly keen on going back to the place where I spent those 11 years. Not because I didn’t love what I did, not because I wasn’t grateful for everything I learned there and especially grateful for having taken advantage of the tuition reimbursement benefit that financed the lion’s share of my master’s degree. It was because it was time to move on, and to grow in a different direction. The job I started last week is the one I never knew I always wanted until I went to library school.

But I did need to earn money. Sweetheart has done the most amazing job of keeping us afloat during the past year, and I was bringing some through my writing and editing. But there really is nothing like the feeling of steady income for some of us, and I’m one of those people. So, when jobs came up that I knew I could do well at my former workplace, I applied.

I suspect that any rejection e-mail I got this week would have made me smile and head straight to my keyboard to type up a response. But it was kind of fun that it was the same exact e-mail I’d seen 11 times before. So I typed up that response, which I did not send. Instead, I am posting a redacted version here.

To anyone out here reading this who is currently trying to find work, I wish you your dream job or one that pays well and that you don’t hate, and I especially wish you the chance to craft a fantasy response to the first rejection letter you get after you start your new gig.

Rejection e-mail #12

Dear Amy:

Thank you for your interest in {insert name of former employer here} and your recent submission to the {job I could do in my sleep} position. We have reviewed your application and have decided to pursue other candidates for this position. We encourage you to review other open positions at our career site and wish you the best of success in your careers search.

Sincerely: “Jerri Blank”

Unsent response to Rejection e-mail # 12

Dear Jerri:

Thank you for your interest in responding to my recent submission to the {job I could do in my sleep} position. I have reviewed your e-mail and have decided that you are absolutely correct in pursuing other candidates for this position.

I have no intention of reviewing other open positions at your career site, as your wishes for success in my “careers search” have been granted. I am deeply grateful for all 12 of them over the course of this past year. Clearly, someone was out there listening.

Sincerely: Amy Waldman

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lifestyle, personal history, Uncategorized, writing

A little post about a happy ending

Last night, I had a work anxiety dream. I’d gotten a new job to which I was supposed to report virtually on my start date – it was a telecommuting setup. It was about 3:30 in the afternoon and I was happily thinking about June 23rd, my first day. Then I looked at a calendar and …oops. It was June 23rd and I spent the rest of the dream (which was mercifully short) figuring out whether there was any possible way I could fix the damage.

Then, Sweetheart woke me up.

“I had my first work anxiety dream!” I said.

Sweetheart handed me my coffee and we chatted about work anxiety dreams. Four hours later, I was opening farewell gifts from the crew at my volunteer job. Leslie, Rose & Sharon got me three really fabulous lanyards, and Heejin got me some beautiful Korean sticky notes based on Chaekga-do.

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From Heejin. They’re sticky notes from Chaekga-do, a fold-screen with shelves full of books. They were folding panels used in scholarly men’s quarters in 18th- and 19th-century Korea. They’re almost too beautiful to use.

 

Lanyards

The card and lanyards from Leslie, Rose & Sharon. The card has two of my favorite things on it!

Today was my last day volunteering in the Digital Programs Unit at Raynor and Memorial Libraries at Marquette University.

Sunday is my birthday, and I have already gotten the best possible present. It’s a new job, the happiest of happy endings and one I never imagined when I enrolled in Foundations of Library Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in January of 2008.

It’s so good that the writers got together for Bonus Writer’s Lunch, which usually only happens once a year.

Writers_Library_CelebrationResized

Bonus Writer’s Lunch!

Monday is my first day as a public librarian. I’d love to tell you that I know exactly what I’ll be doing. But the truth is I only know that every day is going to be a fabulous adventure that combines the best parts of all my previous jobs – project coordinator, journalist, editor, bookseller, teacher, songleader and street performer – with a whole bunch of other new things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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